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Posts Tagged ‘sculpture’

Whilst walking the Sculpture in the City trail 2022, we came across several sculptures that were not part of the trail. It always pays to look up, look down and peer through railings in London to find the hidden stories.

The dachshund, spotted through railings, is in very long and immortalised in a stone bench in Jubilee Gardens. It was created for the London Festival of Architecture in 2018 and was designed by Patrick McEvoy in memory of Geoffrey Barkington, a dachshund. The alien looking statue is placed within the ruins of a medieval charnel house, the oldest building in Spitalfields, which is preserved by the market with steps running down to it. There is an excellent blog post on this area and the ruins on Flickering Lamps. The statues, Choosing the Losing Side by David Teager-Portman, to me looked like an alien coming across an ancient civilisation. The final exhibit we discovered was Absent by Nicholas Dimbleby, a moving memorial to those who die or suffer as a result of war.

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Back to London via Chatsworth House near Bakewell, to see Radical Horizons: The Art of Burning Man at Chatsworth. Perfect combo, a walk via outdoor sculptures. Started the morning in the rain, again, but like Formby, the day before, the sun came out and we got to visit all of them. Favourite was The Flybrary by Christina Sporrong, the giant head. And the unexpected coins making up the bear and cub sculpture, Mum. Well with a visit before 1st October.

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In the previous post we were at Borde Hill. We then drove 30 minutes to the Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden, a totally different setting. It is a natural woodland garden and created to be quite wild whilst carefully curated to show off the sculpture at its best. The paths wind in and out of woods, across bridges and up and down hilly paths and past a smattering of cottages, with green ponds and warnings to wear shoes for slippy paths. There is no cafe but there are places to eat a picnic.

Stand outs for me Joseph Hillier’s figures, particularly the seated ones; David Begbie’s mesh ethereal figures and face; Nimrod Messeg’s iron disintegrating figures; Helen Twigge-Molecey’s glass fungi which light up and Ronald van der Meijs’ 5,000 stainless steel bicycle bells turned into a striking sculpture. We really took our time walking around and then took up the website’s recommendation for lunch at The Scarlett Arms in Walliswood. This sculpture garden alongside Borde Hill combine well in one visit as they are very different settings to each other and both present an opportunity for exercise combined with nature and art.

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The curator at Raveningham Sculpture Trail, written about in previous post, recommended a visit to the The Hannah Peschar Sculpture Garden which we’d never heard of. Looking into it we discovered that the nearby Borde Hill Garden also have a sculpture trail so we combined both with a great lunch at Scarlett Arms in Walliswood.

We started at the Borde Hill which has lovely gardens and off the path beautifully curated spaces with over 80 sculptures placed within them. There are quite a few kinetic sculptures moving in the breeze which are very difficult to capture in a photo and Greer, Guardian Angel by Ed Elliot is there which was awarded Sculpture of the Year 2020 at the Costwold Sculpture Park, one we visited back in July. I particularly liked the tall thin high-heeled and shell bedecked figures by Sara Ingleby-MacKenzie and Carrieann Moore’s sculptures with hardened materials acting as clothing on them. There is also a cafe on site. Another show to return to next year. We then drove on to Hannah Peschar.

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A Curious Turn

Wandering down the King’s Road after the Saatchi we saw an ad in the window of Habitat for A Curious Turn, moving, mechanical sculpture.  The show is in the Platform Gallery on the top floor and is a small but entertaining exhibition where you can turn handles and watch creatures dancing or a donkey draw on an easel.  On until 2nd October.

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It has been over 3 years since we visited Cass Sculpture Foundation in Autumn 2012 and such a difference experience.  This time it was raining but that wasn’t the greatest change; to our surprise the vast majority of the sculpture had changed as well.  There is also a great exhibition of Chinese sculpture A Beautiful Disorder.  We will be back again in 3 years; cannot recommend it enough.  There are loads of seats around and a picnic area and they don’t throw you out at closing time as the gate opens automatically – so given sunshine you can sit, eat and enjoy the view.

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Annual walk around the City area looking at this year’s sculptures.  My favourites were  Laura by Jaume Plensa – seen several of these now but The Dream

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still my favourite.  Also Sunrise East July/October by Ugo Rondinone – passers by certainly noticed these.  I suspect my favourite one would have been Untitled by Enrico David as it looked great on the webiste but it had mysteriously disappeared from outside of the Gherkin.

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The last Sculpture in the City has been installed.  Forever by Ai Weiwei – get along and see it.

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The Charles Wheeler sculptures of Earth and Water outside the Ministry of Defence – weight around 40 tonnes each.

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Wandered around the annual sculpture show in Regent’s Park yesterday.  One of the best exhibits doesn’t photograph well – a circle of speakers playing a song over and over by Kristin Oppenheim “Where did you sleep last night.”  Beautiful.

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